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Tuesday July 3rd 2012

‘Economics’ Archives

Partisan Grading

Partisan Grading

Here is a fascinating finding:We study grading outcomes associated with professors in an elite university in the United States who were identified using voter registration records from the county where the university is located as either Republicans or Democrats. The evidence suggests that student grades are linked to the political orientation of [...]

A Bond Market Meme

A Bond Market Meme

There seems to be a conventional wisdom forming that long-term interest rates in the United States are as about as low as they can possibly be.  For example, this is from an article in today's Wall Street Journal:"Rates are so low it's hard to see them going much lower, but it's easy to imagine them going higher," said Kevin March, chief [...]

Google Plays the Yield Curve

Google Plays the Yield Curve

Click on graphic to enlarge.I was fascinated a story in today's Wall Street Journal.  Apparently, Google is sitting on $37 billion in cash, but nonetheless decided to sell $3 billion worth of bonds.  Why?  To take advantage of low interest rates.It is like reverse maturity transformation.  The banking system borrows short [...]

I agree with Paul Krugman

I agree with Paul Krugman

As my regular blog readers know, Paul Krugman and I often do not see eye to eye.  So, once in a while, it might be useful to point out those times when we actually agree.In a recent post on commodity prices, Paul says, "Volatile prices are volatile, which is why they shouldn’t be used to determine monetary policy."  I agree, and I [...]

If Supermarkets Were Like Public Schools

If Supermarkets Were Like Public Schools

A thought-provoking analogy from Donald Boudreaux:Suppose that groceries were supplied in the same way as K-12 education. Residents of each county would pay taxes on their properties. Nearly half of those tax revenues would then be spent by government officials to build and operate supermarkets. Each family would be assigned to a particular [...]

People Talking Past Each Other

People Talking Past Each Other

I am regularly struck by how bloggers so often want to pick fights with other bloggers.  Rather than giving others the benefit of the doubt, they often seem to interpret the writing of others in the worst possible light so they can then point out how foolish it is.  As an example, see This Steve Landsburg postFollowed by this Brad DeLong [...]

My Talk from Yesterday

My Talk from Yesterday

If you want to see the talk I gave at the University of Cincinnati, click here and then click on "Watch this archived event."  It takes about an hour. This article was originally posted on Greg Mankiw's Blog

Capping Tax Expenditures

Capping Tax Expenditures

A proposal from Martin Feldstein, Daniel Feenberg, and Maya MacGuineas:This paper analyzes a new way of reducing the major individual tax expenditures: capping the total amount that tax expenditures as a whole can reduce each individual's tax burden. More specifically, we examine the effect of limiting the total value of the tax reduction [...]

Academic Bloggers

Academic Bloggers

The NY Times profiles a few. This article was originally posted on Greg Mankiw's Blog

Does GDP buy happiness?

Does GDP buy happiness?

The University of Chicago's Allen Sanderson looks at the topic.By the way, Allen mentions the famous Easterlin paradox.  The facts behind this paradox have been called into question by Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers. This article was originally posted on Greg Mankiw's Blog

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